Translate

Sunday, May 28, 2017

Gifts from Germany

Although my birthday is not until June, my friend in Germany has sent early birthday gifts already! While I am delighted with the contents, I was also dismayed to see that the package had been tampered with. She did not seal the package. It was easily opened. I suppose that Customs, either here or abroad, was responsible for tearing the foil off of a chocolate bunny that was hollow and breaking it into little pieces which were then stuffed back into the package.

Plush pig sent by Tamara Shpolyanska in Germany


The good news is that the stuffed pig, that was either sent un-stuffed or had the stuffing removed by Customs, did not get stained by melted chocolate. The package was not crushed and there is no accounting for the devastation wrought to the chocolate (Lindt) bunny other than human interference. In fact, there was a second chocolate bunny in the package that was unharmed except for a little foil being ripped off.

The pig is stuffed via the nose opening so I was able to add polyester stuffing and then sew on the circular yo-yo type closure with silk thread. Luckily, I had thread that matched the silk she had used.

I was going to call the pig "Petunia" but in the meantime I learned that her name is "Lila the Pig." That works for me. Of course, there were other goodies in the package not the least of which was a personal note card that contained a photo of the latest quilt made by my friend who is an extraordinary quilter and a master craftsman in quilting, certified by I.Q.A.

It is very special to receive a gift from a pen pal overseas. We have been writing to each other and exchanging small textile gifts since the 1990s. Tamara is a very special friend. She teaches quilting to a group of eager quilters in Chemnitz, Germany and her work is often featured in exhibits of art quilts. I am very lucky that she is my friend!

Happy Quilting!

Patricia Cummings




Wednesday, May 10, 2017

More Thoughts about Happiness

Awhile ago I published an essay about "Happiness" and what it means to me. Today I came across a quote from Franklin D. Roosevelt that says a lot about the subject in just a few words:

"Happiness lies in the joy of achievement and the thrill of the creative effort."

In terms of quilting, whenever I have attempted to do something I have never done before, such as making a miniature "Double Wedding Ring" quilt, and have succeeded, there is a certain "joy of achievement." Anything difficult or new is worth trying. We all have our own learning curve and are on our own journeys as quilters.

"Double Wedding Ring" miniature quilt


I was thrilled when I succeeded in making a final quilt for the Embroiderer's Guild of America's "Master Craftsman Program," a testing program, not a class. The creative effort I put forth was great and was a reward in itself for the "thrill" of knowing I did a good job. I was very excited in the year 2000 when I received an e-mail with the coveted word, "Pass" for my quilt "Sunset Serenity at Mt. Fuji." Just one word of praise was sent but that was enough. The long nine year journey toward seeking the title was over!

One does not have to be a quilter to find fulfillment in achievement. Tonight on the television news there was word of an octogenarian who is going to receive a college degree shortly. She had started college but had quit due to becoming married. It was always in her heart to finish and now she will get her wish.

Life is always about starts and finishes. Tonight I am feeling happy to have finished writing a memoir about my own life. There were troubled and turbulent times but I never gave up and never gave in and have had much success in quilting, writing and publishing.

Achievement takes a lot of hard work but achievement is at the heart of happiness. We do not have to measure success in grand terms. Baking a fantastic cake can be as satisfying as climbing a mountain.

Franklin D. Roosevelt knew a thing or two about achievement and the happiness that it brings. Just look at his record of "overcoming" his handicap to be one of the greatest presidents America has ever seen! He lifted America out of the Great Depression in the 1930s and used his creative imagination to establish the Civilian Conservation Corps whose work we still enjoy in the National Parks system.

Doing a good job is what life is all about. Sometimes we are paid for our creativity and work and sometimes we do work just for the satisfaction of producing something tangible that is ours alone.

I hope that you will think about happiness and what it means to you. If you have any ideas you want to share, please feel free to comment!

Happy Quilting!

Patricia Cummings


Wednesday, April 26, 2017

The Nubble Lighthouse

From York Beach, Maine one can see the Nubble Lighthouse at the end of land jutting out into the Atlantic Ocean. One can drive out to the Lighthouse and it is beautiful in any weather. This week, on a sunny day in April, we took the opportunity to drive from New Hampshire to Maine, stopping at Bob's Clam Hut in Kittery, Maine, a famous restaurant of ours for years now. It was a grand day!

The Nubble Light / photo by James Cummings


In 1994 I took a photo of the Nubble Lighthouse in the winter and made a miniature quilt with a photo transfer.


The Nubble Light in Winter / a quilt by Patricia Cummings



Saturday, April 22, 2017

Poem: You Know that You're a Quilter

You Know that You're a Quilter
a poem by Patricia L. Cummings

You know that you're a quilter
When your home could be a shop
So filled it is with notions
and cloth from Fabric Hops.

You know that you're a quilter
When you need a live-in-chef
To remind you of the need to eat
When you'd rather just be left...

To mark and cut and piece and quilt
And sing the whole day through.
You know you are a quilter
AND the things you like to do!

Your children sleep under quilts
that you have made with care.
Your husband wears a quilted vest
Even though others stare.

Your toaster sports a cover,
Quilted with your two hands.
As you work on finishing a quilt
yet another one you plan.

The world is prettier still
Due to quilts that you have made.
They adorn every surface
in homes that are humble or grand.

Doll quilts, wall quilts
And bed quilts, too,
Greet visitors and loved ones
And they're all made by you.

To all quilters now we say:

May your blessings be many,
And your troubles be few.
Take time today to celebrate
All that you do!


###

Thursday, April 13, 2017

Calico Garden

One of the most favorite quilts I ever made is called "Calico Garden" and is a reproduction of a quilt made by Florence Peto in the 1950s. She was a quilt dealer from New Jersey and a quilt historian who was a consultant for the Shelburne Museum when that museum was amassing its quilt collection.

"Calico Garden" 39" x 49"


The quilt took me a year to make. It is pieced, appliqued, and hand-quilted. I used the pattern provided by Hoopla, a company owned by Froncie Quinn. The swags and border flowers are made from chintz fabric and are much larger than the ones on the original quilt that is now held by the Shelburne Museum. I did submit documentation and a photo of the quilt to the museum for their records. A documentation sheet came with the pattern. I finished this quilt in September 2001.